Thing 21: Voice interaction and recording

Perhaps you’re already used to talking to your technology tools? Your library clients may prefer to use their own devices with text-to-speech and speech-to-text apps to take notes, search for information or as assistive technology. There are also many opportunities to create content for library collections and exhibitions by recording voice (eg. oral histories, local stories and literacy activities).

DISCOVER:

EXPLORE:

THINKING POINTS:

  • Could you use text to speech translation software to communicate with clients who speak other languages?
  • Could the computers in your library have software, headphones and microphones to allow clients to use text-to-speech and speech-to-text to browse? Is there a mobile alternative you could offer?
  • Would your library app be more accessible if people could ‘ask a librarian’ rather than trying to type / scroll on a tiny smartphone screen?
  • Could you use mobile devices to record and capture oral histories for your library collection?
  • If you’re designing an app for your library could you include voice recognition?
  • Do teachers in your community use speech-to-text apps in the classroom?
  • Do your clients like to ‘read’ by listening – can they choose a text-to-speech option on the ebooks in your collection? Audible allows a reader to switch “seamlessly between an e-book and a digital audio book”

6 Comments on “Thing 21: Voice interaction and recording

  1. Pingback: Moving to the beat #23mobilethings | Heroes Mingle

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  5. My overwhelming thought so far as library applications go is that voice interaction is another avenue to better serve our home library and visually impaired customers. But for me personally, I agree with the observations made in ‘No more fat fingers’, I’m not sure I would take the time.

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Credits

Jan Holmquist | Mylee Joseph | Kathryn Barwick 2013