Welcome

Welcome to the 23 Mobile Things course website!

The course is self paced, you can work through each lesson at your own speed and share what you’ve learned via Twitter using the #23mobilethings hashtag. Everyone works at their own pace, you may be familiar with some topics already while others may take longer. We suggest that you allocate approximately an hour per week to explore a “Thing”.

The course is freely available to anyone who has access to a mobile device (tablet or smartphone) to participate. The best way to ask for help is to use Twitter and tweet your question with the #23mobilethings hashtag.

The 23 Mobile Things are:

  1. Twitter
  2. Taking a photo with a mobile device:  Instagram / Flickr app / Snapchat
  3. eMail on the move
  4. Maps and checking in
  5. Photos + Maps + Apps: Historypin / What was there / Sepia Town
  6. Video: YouTube and screencasts
  7. Communicate: Skype / Google+ Hangout
  8. Calendar
  9. QR codes
  10. Social reading: RSS / Flipboard / Feedly / Goodreads / Pocket
  11. Augmented reality: Layar / Aurasma / Google Glass / etc.
  12. Recreation and some Angry Birds
  13. Online identity
  14. Curating: Pinterest / Tumblr
  15. Adobe ID
  16. eBooks and eBook apps: Project Gutenberg / Kindle / Overdrive / Bluefire / Kobo, etc.
  17. Evernote and Zotero
  18. Productivity tools: Doodle / Remember the Milk / 30/30
  19. File sharing: Dropbox
  20. Mobile music: last.fm / Spotify / Soundcloud / Rdio
  21. Voice interaction and recording
  22. eResources vendor apps
  23. Digital storytelling
Sep
3

Author:

7 Comments

Thing 23: Digital storytelling

Digital storytelling plays an increasingly visible part in our daily lives. Mobile technologies and apps put the tools to capture and create stories into our hands every day and some organisations are also exploring ways to use storytelling via online tools to engage stakeholders. As the Shanachie team from “This Week in Libraries” often remind us, the mission of libraries includes the goals to “keep stories, make stories, share stories”, increasingly many of these are digital stories.  Your library clients and colleagues may have many different objectives for their digital storytelling activities (eg teaching ESL, compiling local history, sharing family history, collecting oral histories, presenting information in data visualisations and community engagement).

DISCOVER:

EXPLORE:

THINKING POINTS:

  • What roles does your library play in helping your communities to create, share and keep their own stories?
  • How much of the digital storytelling that is happening in your community right now will be accessible in five years time? How could the library keep a sample for readers and researchers of the future?
  • Are there priorities to consider when working with indigenous communities on digital storytelling projects? (eg. Kirsten Thorpe explores the Protocols for libraries and archives in Australia: incorporating Indigenous perspectives in the information field in her IFLA paper).
  • Can you help clients locate the resources they need for digital storytelling projects (eg. public domain or Creative Commons licensed music and images, storytelling apps and web based tools)?
  • What questions do you need to ask before setting up a digital storytelling project to capture local history? Prarienet have some useful tips to consider.

Aug
21

Author:

6 Comments

Thing 22: eResources and vendor apps

Some electronic resources (eg. databases, eBooks, magazines, etc.) are accessible via apps provided by the vendors. This thing is not a recommendation of any particular vendor or product, but is designed to get you to think about your library client’s experience when they use these apps to access your content. Throughout 23 Mobile Things you will have discovered for yourself how variable the experience can be depending on the device you have, the connectivity in your area and the compatibility of apps. All of these factors are important for user experience (UX).

DISCOVER:

EXPLORE:

THINKING POINTS:

  • What information do the vendors collect from your clients via the app?
  • What use statistics do you get from vendor apps?
  • Are clients who use the app easily able to move to other library resources?
  • How do you evaluate vendor apps before offering them to your clients?
  • Which vendor apps could your staff use (e.g. library management system)?
  • In what ways does offering core library services via mobile apps change the way the library reaches people?

Credits

Jan Holmquist | Mylee Joseph | Kathryn Barwick 2013